How To Land Your First Product Management Job

I’ve talked to dozens of aspiring product managers who ask me how to get into product management. They want to be at the intersection of customer, business, and technology. They want to deliver products people love. They want to grow a business. But, how does one get started?

First, let’s clarify a couple of things:

  1. There’s no one educational path to product management. I know great product managers (PMs) who have technical degrees, history degrees, and no degrees. While it may be common for product managers at software companies to have computer science degrees, a technical degree is not required to be a product manager.
  2. There’s no one career path to product management. Some come from engineering backgrounds, others from business backgrounds, and still others from user research and design. You can exercise and grow the skills needed to be a product manager in many different roles. Becoming a product manager means applying those things full-time.

Here are some approaches to getting your first product management job.

Internships

If you’re early in your career, one of the best ways to get into product management is to complete an internship. Product management is an applied trade; there’s no better way to learn than to own real product decisions at a real company with great mentors to help you grow. Internships also let you vet a company to see if you want to work there long-term.

If you’re at a college or university with career fairs, talk to companies hiring product managers at those fairs and find a role that matches your interests and experience. Also, seek out companies you admire online, and contact them to see if they’re hiring PM interns.

School projects

If you’re in college, sign up for as much project-based work as possible. And, make sure you do the work that answers questions that product managers focus on: Who is the customer? What do they want? What problem does the product solve? What is the look and feel of the product? How will you get feedback on the product? How will you measure success?

Sign up for product work

Are you working at a company with product managers? Find a way to stretch into the work they are doing. Talk to a product manager who you work closely with, and see if you can take a task or project from him. Start small: a little customer research, a design wireframe, or a beta test plan is a good first step. Make it clear that you’re there to both do the work and to learn from it, so you’re given something of appropriate scope.

After you do the work, get feedback from the product manager on what went well and what could have gone better. Then, ask for more! Ideally, you get to the point where you are a product manager in all but name, and it’s an easy sell to the right manager to have you formally join the team.

Get a mentor

Have coffee once a month with a product person in your company or at a company in which you have a connection. Find someone that has not just lots of experience, but the kind of experience you’re interested in (consumer products, business products, developer products, and so on). Learn from her what the job entails from her perspective. Ask her to walk you through how she makes product decisions. Get feedback on skills she thinks you need to grow and be successful as a product manager.

Side projects

Have an idea for something great? Come up with the plan, write it down, and socialize it. If you do this for something your company currently focuses on (or should), then pitch the idea to a decision maker. If not, write it down and socialize it with product managers for feedback.

Also, consider a personal project. This can be especially good for those with a technical background who can not only plan and design their product but also build it.

What about classes and books?

I have nothing against product management training. Free, online courses from Coursera may be good if you are brand new to the role and are looking to understand some of the basics. However, I don’t think coursework alone can land you a product management job. A lot of courses out there focus on the mechanics of product management, which is more akin to project management, and are very light on topics like strategy, design, tradeoffs, and experimentation/beta testing.

If you’re considering a paid course, make sure it’s well rounded. And, ask the following: how many graduates have gone on to land product management roles within a few months of completion? If the provider can’t or won’t answer that, I’d be wary of using their program as the primary way to land a product job.

As for books, I’d honestly spend time scouring sites like Medium for posts from product managers talking about their products, instead of reading books about product management.

Hang in there!

Remember, product management is an applied trade. Regardless of how inexperienced you feel, find a way to start doing the job, and get feedback along the way. Sooner or later, you’ll land the role you want.

Oh, and by the way: I’m hiring.

How LinkedIn made a laughably bad mistake and made people think I started working at “Pan”.

In this age of smart agents, machine learning, and artificial intelligence, LinkedIn made a laughably bad mistake on my behalf. 

A couple of days ago I added some information on my LinkedIn profile: I was a panelist for two General Assembly sessions this year. I added this as a “job” (no, I didn’t get paid), and I didn’t mark my current job at Redfin as having ended. I also made a typo and entered “Pan” instead of “General Assembly” as the company name. 

LinkedIn proceeded to tell the thousands of people in my network that I had a new job at “Pan”.
Let’s break down what the software could have done:

  1. It could have noted I had not said my current job had ended.
  2. It could have seen “Pan” didn’t match a known company name (or, if it does, it doesn’t match one that I would likely join). 
  3. It could have seen I fixed “Pan” to General Assembly.
  4. In a state of ambiguity, it could have asked me if I had indeed changed jobs (seeing two “jobs” as active on my profile).

What’s even more alarming is that this is all heuristic-based “intelligence”, and nothing fancy like what many companies are developing in the artificial intelligence space as of late. 

Now I have to explain to the dozen (and counting) people who have reached out to me that no, I have not left Redfin for “Pan”.

This is an amusing story, but it’s also a reminder of how products need to be conscious about user behavior and user errors, and be flexible and communicative when about to do something big on the user’s behalf.

The dark sides of deadlines

Over the past few years, I’ve been devoting less time to reading books. My reading time has gone to magazines, articles, and other short-form journalism. I wasn’t happy about this, but I didn’t do much to change it.

A few weeks ago, we visited the beautiful Central Library here in Seattle to get my daughter her first library card. When I inquired about my card, the librarian said it was long expired, and issued me a new one.

Curious about Seattle Public Library’s online collection, I checked out a couple of non-fiction books that I’ve been meaning to read (Business Adventures which Bill Gates recommended a couple of years ago, and The Hard Thing About Hard Things which more than one person recommended to me at work).

When I checked the electronic books out and downloaded them to my phone, I saw that I had 21 days to read them before they were automatically returned. 21 days! And then they’re gone! I had a deadline.

I read these books during my commute. I read them at night before bed. I even check out the audiobook versions so I can listen to them being read to me during chores at home. The result: I’m reading more books now than I have in the past few years. This is the power of deadlines: it provides clarity in priorities, and forces you to decide what’s really important to hit the date.

However, there are dark sides to deadlines, too.

The dark sides

When you apply time pressure on tasks, creative thinking can suffer. Worse, a Harvard Business School study found that people under time pressure think they’re being more creative when they’re actually less creative. Even worse, there seems to be a hangover to the lull in creativity that can last for a few days after the time crunch.

Why is this? The root cause appears to be lack of focus. Here’s what the study says about people who lacked time to focus during time-pressured days:

But when this protected focus was missing on time-pressured days—and it very often was—people felt more like they were on a treadmill. On these days, our diarists reported a more extreme level of time pressure even though they were not working more hours, and they felt much more distracted. When recording the number of different activities they performed, they were likely to use words like “several,” “many,” and “too numerous to count.” They were pulled in too many directions, unable to focus on a single activity for any significant period of time. One diarist, paraphrasing the oft-repeated lament, said: “The faster I run, the behinder I get.”

Cramming work at the last minute can also result in lower-quality work. A study from Syracuse University showed that patent applications clustered near the deadlines, and those that were completed at the deadline were both more complex and of lower quality.

And, too many aggressive deadlines with no end in sight can create a condition of chronic stress on the mind and body, which can lead to burnout.

Use deadlines wisely

Deadlines are of course not inherently bad. Work can fill all available time, and if there is no bound to that time, you and your team may never get a plan together to deliver something of value. The trick is to use deadlines in a productive way.

As for my library reading, I’ve decided to check out only one or two books at a time. After all, I don’t want my library checkouts to mean I never read magazines and articles anymore!

Remember to have a good reason for each deadline you communicate to your team. Make sure the deadline is achievable. And, above all, make sure your team uses the deadline as a way to focus on what is most important, instead of trying to do too many things at once and doing them all poorly.